Original Source:
Dan Minogue Tells Why He - Gave Up Mining for Football
Sporting Globe 10-Jul-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180835561


Dan Minogue Tells Why He- Gave Up Mining for Football

Dan Minogue begins today his own story of his distinguished career. And a human, gripping story this great football personality has to tell! It is brimming with all the incident, thrills, humor and pathos which he has encountered during a quarter of a century as crack player and successful captain and coach. Turning back Time, Dan takes readers behind the scenes with him; into club rooms and on to playing fields as he lives again his hours of triumph —and disappointment.

In his first instalment of a fascinating series, he describes his career from his early days as a miner at Bendigo. then on through stirring times with Collingwood and Richmond, until his advent as coach at St. Kilda, where he vowed to turn the Saints into Devils' —and has done so.

By DAN MINOGUE,
with P. J. Millard

I DID not become a League footballer by accident. It was deliberate design on my part. You see, I was a miner at Bendigo; and, for reasons which I regarded as good, sufficient and pressing, and which I shall immediately explain. I wanted to change my lot, So I decided to 3 capitalise my football ability, I have never regretted the step.

As I toiled as a miner in Bendigo in my younger days, the desire to get away from a life that seemed to hold no future and little happiness for me, became stronger and stronger, and finally an obsession. It got right under my skin. Football rescued me.

I had seen the saddening spectacle of many fine young fellows being stricken down with the dreaded miners' disease to die prematurely—young blooms literally cut off in their prime.

That tragic side of the arduous occupation of miner set me flunking deeply. And the more I thought of it the more convinced I became that there were far better things in the world than being a miner.

"You’d better get out while your luck's in, Danny, my boy." I said to myself. My resolve was suddenly strengthened in startling fashion. One day I accidentally fell some 60 feet down a shaft I was terribly 5 shaken and bruised, but luckily. I escaped with that. I was fortunate not to be killed, or, at any rate, seriously injured.

That's the gipsy's warning I muttered to myself. I became all the more determined to quit a life which I was beginning to dislike intensely. But how was I to get away? Ah, I had it – football! That was my escape And so It proved.

I am not trying to boast, but merely recording an essential part of my story, when I say that at the time, I was considered rather a good footballer in Bendigo. 1 played every week for recreation—about the only recreation I got beyond a little rowing with Sandhurst R.C on Lake Weeroona.

The City Calls


Indeed, some League scouts from Melbourne had already suggested to me that I was suitable material for polishing up in the city, and that I could do worse than seek my football fame and fortitude there.

I had not paid much heed to them previously but, after I bad broken the speed record for a descent down that shaft. I turned my thoughts to Melbourne. 1 was seized with the ambition to go there, and as soon as possible, too. To me, "the matter was urgent" as the radio announcers say.

At that lime 1 had no preference for any particular League club in Melbourne. Any club would have served my purpose. However, I pondered deeply over attractive offers in two letters, which I had just received from Ernie Copeland. Collingwood Secretary, and Con Hickey, Fitzroy Secretary. Eventually I decided to go to Collingwood. as their offer of employment was more definite - it meant going to a job at the South Melbourne gasworks as soon as I arrived. That was in 1911.

I was assured that I would have been chosen for Collingwood the previous year (1910) – when I came down and did exceptionally well at practice – only that on the Wednesday before the League season opened in Melbourne, I played the first ‘senior’ game of my life with California Gully, in the Bendigo competition.


Gully are now defunct, but at that time, when I was a youth of 18, they were one of the four senior clubs in Bendigo. We had in Bendigo a good many players who on Saturdays also played with League teams in Melbourne. From then we learned the finer points of the game.

Appearing with California Gully like that in 1910 made me ineligible for Collingwood until the next year. Perhaps I was foolish to Strip for Gully, and so for the time spoil my chance with Collingwood, but I was young and a bit impetuous, and was in the thick of it for Gully »J-, most before I realised it.

Queer Trophy


Playing as follower and centre half forward, I was that day adjudged equal best with another player in the California Gully 18 for a trophy. The joke about the trophy was that it was a pair of trousers, presented by a Bendigo tailor. In those days men often bought a pair of striped pants to wear with a separate coat and vest.

In view of the obvious difficulty In dividing the prize he couldn't very well slice it up and give us a leg apiece - the tailor sprang us each a pair of trousers! He was a sport all right.


I have only a hazy recollection about the first ‘football’ I ever kicked, but I seem to remember faintly, as a tiny nipper, kicking the stuffing out of a ball, made with an old sock for a cover and filled with a discarded shirt. But I felt my first real itch to play football when I was a schoolboy at Marist Brothers College Bendigo.

From school football I graduated to junior ranks by joining St Killans at Bendigo. They were a first- rate junior side. It was while playing with them that I first came under notice of Melbourne clubs. Altogether I received invitations to come down and train with Fitzroy, Essendon, St.Kilda, Carlton and Collingwood.

As I have said, I went to have my first try-out with Collingwood in 1910. Until that year a player could appear in a Bendigo League side on Wednesday and also with a Melbourne League team on the Saturday. But this was stopped in 1910 - the very season I left junior football. That was why, having played with California Gully, I could not go to the Magpie nest to play tht seson.

At the time when Bendigo players were playing in Melbourne on Saturdays, we footballers and fans in Bendigo got a great kick from listening – with a certain amount of reverence, by the way – to their exciting experiences in the big Melbourne games. They were to a large extent heros in our eyes. We always listened to them with rapt attention, many of us cherishing the ambition to go and do likewise.

High Jinks

Prominent among such players who played the dual role was Fred Jinks of Carlton fame who also turned out with the Eaglehawk team on Wednesdays. Tall and wiry, and about 14 stone. Fred was meant by Nature to be the rugged footballer he was. His very powerful shoulders and long arms, with his octopus grip, made him a difficult customer to cope with. He could make the game just as willing as the enemy wanted it.

His courage was colossal. I was very amused when I read of some other players trying to test his gameness when he first appeared at Carlton. Needless to say, Fred emerged from the test with flying colors, leaving one particular player, who he tried the rough stuff on him, sadder and wiser.


Other well known men who played in both Bendigo and Melbourne in the same season were: Paddy Mills, Melbourne and South Bendigo, ‘Henna’ Wright, Melbourne and South Bendigo; Joe Canavan , Melbourne and Long Gully and South Bendigo; Charlie Clymo, St Kilda and Eaglehawk; Tommy Baxter, Collingwood and Long Gully; Bert Pearce, St Kilda and South Bendigo; Len Bowe, Essendon and Long Gully.

Then there were the three celebrated Daykin brothers, trio of fine fellows and footballers. ‘Bony’ Daykin starred with Long Gully, and with Baxter was a member of Collingwood’s premier team in 1910. ‘Dubs’ Daykin made a name with South Bendigo and Carlton; and ‘Red’ Daykin with South Bendigo and Essendon. I forgot some of the Daykin’s first names, but their expressive nicknames are still a vivid memory.

I take off my hat to all these and other grand players who did so much to raise the standard of the game in Bendigo. They were real footballer, all the Daykins, the Jinks, the Clymos, the Bowes, the Canavans and the rest of the classy gang.

The very first man ever to coach me at football was the self-same Joe Canavan. While I was playing with St Killans he was our coach. From Joe I learned many a wrinkle. A polished rover himself, he had the faculty, some-what rare even in the present days, of imparting his knowledge to others. As Joe and I worked together in the Carlisle mine (Long Gully), we formed a firm friendship, which was carried into football.

‘Bony’ Daykin, who also worked as a miner alongside me, gave me many valuable hints on the art—and it is an art—of following. His breezy chats on his games in Melbourne quickened my urge to go to the big city and take part in such thrilling experiences myself.

At length. In 1911, came my great hour. I was chosen to play with the renowned Collingwood. I had shifted to Melbourne. I had left the grimy old mine behind me—for good, I fervently hoped. I was looking forward to a rose-ate future. In which beautiful sunshine and football would replace the oppressiveness, heat dust and foul air of a miner's existence.


And so, to my heartfelt relief, changed from "Miner to Magpie." No more incessant weary burrowing into the very bowels of the earth. Hence-forth, if I had my way, I'd be a Magpie—flying gloriously in the fresh air, and enjoying life

My League Debut


My first game in League football: Shall 1 ever forget it! It was. for me, both a triumph and a tragedy. It was against Richmond (whom I led later), on the opening day of the 1911 season. Thrust into the key position of centre halfback. 1 was pitted against the redoubtable, high-marking Tom Heaney — a champion on his day, if ever there was one. It was a fiery baptism for a recruit But I gritted my teeth Next week I will describe my stirring tussles with Heaney—and the sequel. Near the finish I accidentally sustained a nasty mishap, which proved a temporary setback. But after the game. I had the satisfaction of hearing the Collingwood selectors saying: "Well done, lad!"

My performance in that to me, vital match, put me on the road to football success. Tm thankful to say. I played or six seasons with Collingwood, the last three – (1914, ’15 and part of ’16) – as captain. Then I went to the war as a gunner, and served on the Western Front. My term with the A.I.F. kept me occupied from the latter part of 1916 until 1 returned to Australia on June 27 1919.

Herald 17 Jul 1911 P6 Dan Minogue Collingwood
Herald 17 Jul 1911 P6 Dan Minogue Collingwood


1914 Sniders N Abrahams I Collingwood Dan Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
1914 Sniders N Abrahams I Collingwood Dan Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
AFL Record 1914 R1 P22 Dan Minogue Collingwood
AFL Record 1914 R1 P22 Dan Minogue Collingwood
1915 Sport Magazine 'Footballer Postcard' For 'Collingwood F.C. D.Minogue Carters
1915 Sport Magazine 'Footballer Postcard' For 'Collingwood F.C. D.Minogue Carters
Winner 22 Nov 1916 P6 Private Dan Minogue
Winner 22 Nov 1916 P6 Private Dan Minogue
Winner 20 Dec 1916 P7 Match In London
Winner 20 Dec 1916 P7 Match In London


A few days after my return. 1 applied to the League for permission to play with Richmond Having been out of Australia for more than three years, I did not need a clearance from Collingwood. Technically, I had ceased to be a member of that club. But to my amazement the League refused my application on the ground that it had not been lodged by July 1.

That. to me, seemed like splitting straws. and a rather raw deal for a returned soldier. Only my military discipline prevented me from saying what I thought at the time.


I now reveal, for the first time, my real reason for wanting to transfer to the Tigers. It has been the subject of speculation by fans ever since. They were puzzled at my not going straight back to the Magpies, especially after having captained them. Well, rightly or wrongly, I did not approve of the way that Collingwood treated a great pal of mine – a fine player for them – while I was away at the war. Never mind his name. You’d recognise it at once. But it doesn’t matter now.


Ed. He is referring to Jim Sadler. For more information of Collingwood’s view of Minogue’s exit, there is a great article by Grey McFarlane on their website - Headliners No. 17: The defection - Glenn McFarlane


Collingwood J Sadler 1910 R02
Collingwood J Sadler 1910 R02


I may have allowed sentiment to sway my feelings in that case — I don't know. But I have never had cause to feel sorry for my action.

Attracted To Tigers


It was Norman Clark, of Carlton fame; then coaching Richmond, who made the first overtures to me in 1919, to become a Tiger. As I had also formed a great friendship with that magnificent footballer, Hughie James, while on active service. I felt strongly attracted towards Richmond.

In 1920 Clark went back to coach Carlton again; and, having by now received my permit I was appointed playing coach of Richmond. I had the honor of leading them to their first two League premierships, that season and the next. What proud days those were!


For six years I was captain and coach of the Tigers. Then, late in 1925 season. I had one of my knees injured, and did I not play again with Richmond, resolving to retire as player. But In 1926 Hawthorn offered me a position as coach. I accepted, not intending to play. However, one day I played in a practice match, and my leg did not trouble me. So I became their captain as well. But for one match only. My knee went before the game was finished. I stuck it out till the final bell. But 1 never played League football again. I was coach at Hawthorn for two seasons.

Herald 2 Jul 1920 P3 Dan Minogue And D Moffatt Richmond
Herald 2 Jul 1920 P3 Dan Minogue And D Moffatt Richmond


1921 Magpie Rays 18 Richmond Dan Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
1921 Magpie Rays 18 Richmond Dan Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
1921 McIntyre Bros Football Champions Series 1 D.Minogue (Richmond)
1921 McIntyre Bros Football Champions Series 1 D.Minogue (Richmond)
1922 Magpie Richmond D Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
1922 Magpie Richmond D Minogue Otway Jack (thecollectingbug)
AFL Record 1921 Week 4 Finals P11 Dan Minogue Richmond
AFL Record 1921 Week 4 Finals P11 Dan Minogue Richmond
1922 Magpie Cigarettes Richmond Dan Minogue
1922 Magpie Cigarettes Richmond Dan Minogue
Farmers Advocate 16 May 1924 P4 Dan Minogue Richmond
Farmers Advocate 16 May 1924 P4 Dan Minogue Richmond
Farmers' Advocate Melbourne 20 Jun 1924 P5 Dan Minogue Richmond
Farmers' Advocate Melbourne 20 Jun 1924 P5 Dan Minogue Richmond
Herald 8 Jun 1925 Dan Minogue Richmond
Herald 8 Jun 1925 Dan Minogue Richmond


Unique Record

Thus I hold the unique record of being the only player ever to captain three League teams. Another thing I am proud of is that during the whole of my career as a player, I was never reported by an umpire, nor was 1 ever concerned in any incident as a result of which a player was reported. And this, notwithstanding that I was always a follower in the ruck, where all the heavy work is supposed to go on!

From Hawthorn I went to Tasmania for a most delightful season as captain and
coach of New Town (Hobart). I really went in the first place as non-playing coach, but once again, forgetting my Hawthorn lesson, I felt the urge to play. My knee did not let me down this time. I played throughout the season. My days in Hobart are among the happiest of my life.

While on a visit to Hobart Carlton officials approached me to coach their team the next year. They knew that I had gone to Hobart for only one season on exchange duty in the Postal Department (which I entered as telephone mechanic In 1915). Accepting Carlton's offer, I coached the Dark Blues in a non-playing capacity for six seasons. In 1935 I was appointed non-playing coach by St Kilda - a job I still hold with very great pleasure.

In an article which 1 wrote in The Sporting Globe when I began with St. Kilda. 1 said I was determined to "Turn the Saints into Devils." Of course, that Was necessarily a gradual process. But I think I can claim that the transformation is now practically complete. St Kilda are in “the four” to stay, believe me.


Argus 23 Apr 1929 P5 Dan Minogue Carlton
Argus 23 Apr 1929 P5 Dan Minogue Carlton


Sporting Globe 9 Mar 1935 P7 Dan Minogue St Kilda
Sporting Globe 9 Mar 1935 P7 Dan Minogue St Kilda


The Age 3 May 1929 P5 Dan Minogue Carlton
The Age 3 May 1929 P5 Dan Minogue Carlton
The Sporting Globe Football Book 1929 P49 Dan Minogue
The Sporting Globe Football Book 1929 P49 Dan Minogue
The Age 25 May 1936 P4 Dan Minogue StKilda
The Age 25 May 1936 P4 Dan Minogue StKilda
Age 16 Jul 1937 P7 StKilda Team
Age 16 Jul 1937 P7 StKilda Team
Herald 9 Apr 1937 P17 Dan Minogue StKilda
Herald 9 Apr 1937 P17 Dan Minogue StKilda



END

Editors Notes


Playing career
YearsClubPlayer (Games/Goals)Coaching (W–L–D)
1911–1916Collingwood85 (37)
1916-1919WW1 Service--
1920–1925Richmond94 (38)105 (59–45–1)
1926–1927Hawthorn1 (2)36 (4–31–1)
1928New Town (Tas)??
1929–1934Carlton 117 (85–32–0)
1935–1937St Kilda 54 (30–24–0)
1938St Kilda Seconds ?
1940–1942Fitzroy 51 (25–26–0)
Total 180 (77)363 (203–158–2)


This article is the first of a series of articles about Minogue's career.

Sporting Globe 10 Jul 1937 P8 Gave Up Mining For Football
Sporting Globe 10 Jul 1937 P8 Gave Up Mining For Football
This article
Sporting Globe 17 Jul 1937 P8 Broke Collarbone In First League Game
Sporting Globe 17 Jul 1937 P8 Broke Collarbone In First League Game
Dan Minogue Tells How He ...Broke his Collarbone in his first League game
Sporting Globe 17-Jul-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180836009
Sporting Globe 24 Jul 1937 P8 Would Not Leave Field
Sporting Globe 24 Jul 1937 P8 Would Not Leave Field
Dan Minogue Again Broke Collarbone Early but would not leave the field
Sporting Globe 24-Jul-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180836575
Sporting Globe 31 Jul 1937 P8 League Captain At 22
Sporting Globe 31 Jul 1937 P8 League Captain At 22
Dan Minogue was League Captain at 22
Sporting Globe 31-Jul-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180837234
Sporting Globe 7 Aug 1937 P8 Bluff That Nearly Put Him Out
Sporting Globe 7 Aug 1937 P8 Bluff That Nearly Put Him Out
Dan Minogue Tells Of Bluff that nearly put him out
Sporting Globe 7-Aug-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180837882
Sporting Globe 14 Aug 1937 P8 Never Heard Of Collingwood
Sporting Globe 14 Aug 1937 P8 Never Heard Of Collingwood
Refusing Leave, Officer Tells Dan Minogue He Had Never Heard of Collingwood
Sporting Globe 14-Aug-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180838310
Sporting Globe 21 Aug 1937 P8 Famous AIF Match In London
Sporting Globe 21 Aug 1937 P8 Famous AIF Match In London
Dan Minogue Describes Famous A.I.F. Match in London
Sporting Globe 21-Aug-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180838936
Sporting Globe 28 Aug 1937 P8 Left Sick Bed To Win Premiership
Sporting Globe 28 Aug 1937 P8 Left Sick Bed To Win Premiership
When Dan Minogue Left Sick Bed to Win Premiership
Sporting Globe 28-Aug-1938 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180839478
Sporting Globe 4 Sep 1937 P8 Stole Pennant From Carlton
Sporting Globe 4 Sep 1937 P8 Stole Pennant From Carlton
Minogue Tells How Richmond Stole Pennant from Richmond
Sporting Globe 4-Sep-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180840044
Sporting Globe 11 Sep 1937 P8 Richmonds Most Sensational Season
Sporting Globe 11 Sep 1937 P8 Richmonds Most Sensational Season
Dan Minogue Describes Richmonds most sensational Season
Sporting Globe 11-Sep-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180840464
Sporting Globe 22 Sep 1937 P2 Carlton Avenged An Insult
Sporting Globe 22 Sep 1937 P2 Carlton Avenged An Insult
Dan Minogue Tells How How Carlton Avengend an Insult
Sporting Globe 18-Sep-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180841134
Sporting Globe 25 Sep 1937 P8 Clover Greatest Post War Star
Sporting Globe 25 Sep 1937 P8 Clover Greatest Post War Star
Clover Greatest of All Post War Stars - 12 men who shone in Set Positions
Sporting Globe 25-Sep-1937 p8
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180841607


You can also read Minogue's view on the Associations Throw Pass rule in Sporting Globe 6-Aug-1938 p5 - http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article180868338


Dan Minogue




Dan Minogue Australasian 8 Jun 1940 P14
Dan Minogue Australasian 8 Jun 1940 P14